Round Up Week of July 1

 Guava, zucchini, lettuce, cauliflower, & barley. Chard, cherimoya, coriander & maize.

Guava, zucchini, lettuce, cauliflower, & barley. Chard, cherimoya, coriander & maize.

1) Mario Fuentes Captures the Contribution of Immigrants with Seeds

These foods, notes Ecuadoran poster artist Mario Fuentes, share a common background — they were introduced to cultures around the world by immigrants bringing them from other countries. Last year, Fuentes decided to create a poster for the Typography Day 2017 international competition, organized by the Department of Integrated Design at the University of Moratuwa in Colombo, Sri Lanka. The theme of the competition was “Typography and Diversity.” Fuentes’s creative entry — a collection of nine photos featuring seeds from plants contributed by immigrants — ended up being displayed in the Typography Day 2017 competition at the University of Moratuwa.

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 A screenshot of the scene in the  NRA video  that uses Sir Anish Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate” for roughly a second. (screenshot by Hyperallergic)

A screenshot of the scene in the NRA video that uses Sir Anish Kapoor’s “Cloud Gate” for roughly a second. (screenshot by Hyperallergic)

2) Sir Anish Kapoor’s Clenched Fist of Copyright, the Battle Over Fair Use, and the NRA

On June 19 of this year, artist Sir Anish Kapoor, a knighted and “renowned visionary sculptor,” filed a copyright infringement claim in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois, Eastern Division, alleging that the National Rifle Association (NRA) used a fleeting image of one of his sculptures without permission in a video in order to “support its despicable platform of promoting violence, private ownership of all manner of firearms in the United States, including military assault weapons, and using its money and political power to block any kind of meaningful gun control.”

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 Here, the "I Am a Child" sign references the iconic "I Am a Man" signs during the Civil Rights movement.  Image by Kate Warren

Here, the "I Am a Child" sign references the iconic "I Am a Man" signs during the Civil Rights movement.  Image by Kate Warren

3) The Most Emotional Photos from D.C.'s Families Belong Together March

Photographer Kate Warren joined thousands of people in D.C. on Saturday, June30, to photograph the families marching in protest of Trump's zero tolerance immigration policy.  Children marched alongside their parents - many of whom are immigrants, or the descendants of immigrants, themselves.  Reasons for why the were marching varied, but there was one constant throughline: they were marching for the 2,000 children who are still detained, separated from their families, unable to march themselves.

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4) In the Land of Guns, Masculinity, Whiteness, and Power Are Often Inseparable

Addison Gallery of American Art in Andover, Massachusetts has mounted an exhibition titled Gun Country

The exhibition, which consists of photography culled from the Addison Gallery of American Arts’s collection, demonstrates that the gun exists as an ideal, a prop for power, a tool, and as a metaphor.

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 A girl playing in a river. Credit: Mahtab Hussain

A girl playing in a river. Credit: Mahtab Hussain

5) A Child of Immigrants Photographs the Life He Might Have Led

In “Going Back Home,” the British-Pakistani photographer Mahtab Hussain explores the life he could have had if his parents never emigrated.

His book, “Going Back Home to Where I Came From,” is a visual diary depicting the life he would have led had his parents never left. Its title refers to the xenophobic insult British strangers have hurled at him.

More important, it also raises the question: Where is home?

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 Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936. © The Dorothea Lange Collection, the Oakland Museum of California

Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936. © The Dorothea Lange Collection, the Oakland Museum of California

6) Photography and Social Change: Dorothea Lange and the Politics of Seeing

A new exhibition of Dorothea Lange’s work at the Barbican Centre in London offers a more expansive outlook on the photographer’s life as a trailblazing social documentarian.

Broadening Lange’s narrative and contextualizing Migrant Mother as a moment within an expansive career, a new retrospective of Lange’s work has just opened at the Barbican in London. Titled Dorothea Lange: The Politics of Seeing, the exhibition traces the photographer’s work and legacy across multiple decades, articulating her working process through prints and archival materials, such as featured issues of LIFE magazine, first edition copies of breakthrough publications, and Lange’s own field notes and letters.

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7) NPPA Calls for Photojournalists’ Access to Detention Facilities

The National Press Photographers Association (NPPA) calls on all politicians who visit migrant child detention facilities to insist on being accompanied by visual journalists and to insist that Immigration and Customs Enforcement permits unfettered access to those facilities for all journalists.

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