Round Up Week of March 10

The Producer’s picks for this week’s news relevant to the photography, art, design and production industries:


1) How Women Photographers Access Worlds Hidden From Men

PHOTOGRAPH BY HANNAH REYES MORALES

PHOTOGRAPH BY HANNAH REYES MORALES

There are benefits to being a photographer who happens to be a woman: you’re welcomed into secret worlds, invited into homes, and trusted with the most delicate subjects. Then there are the downsides: fighting to be taken seriously by a male-dominated industry, entering dangerous and unpredictable situations, and tackling stereotypes about where women should go and the topics they should cover. We asked National Geographic's women photographers from across the world for memories and reflections on how gender is intertwined with their work, the opportunities for young women coming after them, and the future of their field. They showed us their favorite photographs of women—a young falconer in Mongolia (above), a Saudi motorcyclist, a Japanese geisha taking a smoking break—and told us the behind-the-scenes stories. They also told us they were optimistic that the status quo is changing, thanks to those who fought for decades to be taken seriously. "For a very long time, we've been predominantly looking at the world through the experience and vision of male photographers," says photographer Daniella Zalcman. "That's changing more and more rapidly now—and it's about time." Here are their words and photographs.

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2) Female in Focus: An Award for Women Photographers

© Kourtney Roy, from the series Middle of Fucking Nowhere

© Kourtney Roy, from the series Middle of Fucking Nowhere

This International Women’s Day, we are pleased to announce the opening of our new global award, Female in Focus

Did you know that across the photography industry, just 1 in 9 award winners are women? And while equality in our own awards is improving, last year only 38% of our winners were female. If we are to make real steps towards equality in the photography industry, we must start at home.

It is for neither lack of interest nor talent that the photography industry is so imbalanced. While just 15% of professional photographers are women, 80% of photography graduates are female. We want to know what is happening to these promising graduates, and to re-engage the talent that gets lost along the way by giving underrepresented photographers the tools and platforms to succeed. By valuing everyone and their stories, equally, we can start to make photography more fair and more representative.  

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3) Galleries are Focusing on Female Artists to Tackle the Industry's Gender Divide

artnewspaper.png

As the #MeToo movement continues to highlight gender disparity, a new report shows that female artists are still lagging behind their male counterparts in terms of gallery representation and sales. The 2019 Art Basel and UBS Global Art Market Report by Clare McAndrew, released today, reveals that 10% of the 3,050 galleries surveyed have no women on their rosters, while only 8% represent more women than men and almost half (48%) represent 25% or fewer women.

Coinciding with Women’s History Month, many dealers are attempting to redress the balance, although moving the needle on parity will take time and dedication—and action.

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4) Art World Inequities Spark Labour Campaign by Museum Workers

Union pins Courtesy of SFMoMA union

Union pins Courtesy of SFMoMA union

In 2016, The Art Newspaper found that US museums had spent almost $5bn on expansions over the course of seven years while “in a state of constant growth”. Today that trend seems to hold steady: museums continue to expand, raising and spending huge sums of money in the process. But the past year has also seen the rise of a different but related phenomenon: a wave of labour organising and contract disputes at some of those same institutions. For workers, it seems, the high-flying expenditures have thrown low pay into sharp relief.

The most noteworthy example may be the New Museum, which is in the midst of an $85m expansion. Despite the institution’s progressive founding values, its staff have never been unionized—until now. Watching the museum raise millions of dollars for a building project while some salaries were stuck at $35,000, workers voted overwhelmingly in January to organize under the banner of UAW Local 2110. This came after the institution controversially sought advice from an outside firm specializing in “union avoidance”.

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5) The Best Photos From the 76th Pictures of the Year International

A  Central American migrant hugging her child on the beach in San Diego  after crossing the border wall at Tijuana Beach, Mexico. December 2018. Credit: Fabio Bucciarelli for Yahoo News

A Central American migrant hugging her child on the beach in San Diego after crossing the border wall at Tijuana Beach, Mexico. December 2018. Credit: Fabio Bucciarelli for Yahoo News

Fabio Bucciarelli was named Photographer of the Year in the 76th Pictures of the Year International competition for a portfolio featuring his coverage of Gaza and the United States-Mexico border published by Yahoo News. Jessica Phelps was named Newspaper Photographer of the Year for her work at The Newark Advocate, her hometown newspaper in central Ohio. The Multimedia Photographer of the Year award went to Emily Kassie of the Marshall Project.

The New York Times received the Angus McDougall Overall Excellence in Editing award from POYi, which is a program of the Missouri School of Journalism. Jeffrey Furticella, a Times metro photo editor, was named Newspaper Visual Editor of the Year, while Morrigan McCarthy of The Times’s national desk received an Award of Excellence in that category. Jonah Kessel of The Times was a finalist for Multimedia Photographer of the Year.

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6) Making Copyright Infringement Claims is Now Harder for Photographers

Be proactive and copyright all of your work, especially pieces you plan on sharing with the masses.

Phoblographer

Phoblographer

Being able to share our work with millions upon millions of people is great. You can snap a picture, it can go viral, and someone may even want to buy your work. Unfortunately, there are those who like to skip that last part and just take what’s not theirs. In the past, if you had noticed that your work had been taken illegally you could register a copyright for your work, and then you could start proceedings against the party who infringed on your property. But a new U.S Supreme court ruling has changed all of that.

An article over at the The National Law Review covers the news in great depth, but the gist of it is that if you don’t have a currently registered copyright on your work (not just photographs, but anything) you cannot claim infringement against those who may have wronged you. As stated above, in the past if you found your work had been stolen you could go through the motions to register a copyright and then file a suit, but now you may have to wait months before you can start legal proceedings as the application for the copyright must be completed and not just be on file.

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